Site Logo
Looking for girlfriend > Looking for a husband > How can a diabetic woman get pregnant

How can a diabetic woman get pregnant

Diabetes is a condition in which the body can't make enough insulin, or can't use insulin normally. Insulin is a hormone. This leads to high blood sugar hyperglycemia. High blood sugar can cause problems all over the body. It can damage blood vessels and nerves. It can harm the eyes, kidneys, and heart.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: How Diabetics Should Prepare Prior to Pregnancy

Content:
SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Can diabetes affect fertility? - Nourish with Melanie #88

I have diabetes. What should I know before I get pregnant?

Back to Your pregnancy and baby guide. Most pregnant women with diabetes will go on to have a healthy baby, but there are some possible complications you should be aware of.

The information on this page is for women who were diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes before they got pregnant. It doesn't cover gestational diabetes — high blood sugar that develops during pregnancy and usually goes away after the baby is born.

They will advise you about what to do. Find out more about pregnancy and coronavirus. People with diabetes are at risk of developing problems with their eyes diabetic retinopathy and kidneys diabetic nephropathy. Some people with type 1 diabetes can develop diabetic ketoacidosis , where harmful chemicals called ketones build up in the blood. There's also a slightly higher chance of your baby being born with birth defects, particularly heart and nervous system abnormalities, or being stillborn or dying soon after birth.

But managing your diabetes well, before and during your pregnancy, will help to reduce these risks. The best way to reduce the risks to you and your baby is to ensure your diabetes is well controlled before you become pregnant. Before you start trying for a baby, ask your GP or diabetes specialist diabetologist for advice.

You should be referred to a diabetic pre-conception clinic for support. Find diabetes support services near you. You should be offered a blood test, called an HbA1c test, every month. This measures the level of glucose in your blood. It's best if the level is no more than 6. If you can't get your level below 6. You should continue using contraceptives until you get your blood glucose under control. Your GP or diabetes specialist can advise you on how best to do this.

If you have type 1 diabetes, you should be given testing strips and a monitor to test your blood ketone levels, to check for diabetic ketoacidosis. You should use these if your blood glucose levels are high, or if you are vomiting or have diarrhoea. Women with diabetes should take a higher dose of 5 milligrams mg of folic acid each day while trying to get pregnant and until they are 12 weeks pregnant. Your doctor will have to prescribe this, as 5mg tablets are not available over the counter.

Taking folic acid helps to prevent your baby from developing birth defects, such as spina bifida. If you usually take tablets to control your diabetes, you'll normally be advised to switch to insulin injections, either with or without a drug called metformin. If you already use insulin injections to control your diabetes, you may need to switch to a different type of insulin. If you take drugs for conditions related to your diabetes, such as high blood pressure, these may have to be changed.

It's very important to attend any appointments made for you so that your care team can monitor your condition and react to any changes that could affect your or your baby's health. You will need to monitor your blood glucose levels more frequently during pregnancy, especially since nausea and vomiting morning sickness can affect them.

Your GP or midwife will be able to advise you on this. Keeping your blood glucose levels low may mean you have more low-blood-sugar hypoglycaemic attacks "hypos".

These are harmless for your baby, but you and your partner need to know how to cope with them. Talk to your doctor or diabetes specialist. You will be offered regular diabetic eye screening during your pregnancy.

This is to check for signs of diabetic eye disease diabetic retinopathy. Screening is very important when you are pregnant because the risk of serious eye problems is greater in pregnancy. If you decide not to have the test, you should tell the clinician looking after your diabetes care during pregnancy.

If you have diabetes, it's strongly recommended that you give birth in a hospital with the support of a consultant-led maternity team. Your doctors may recommend having your labour started early induced because there may be an increased risk of complications for you or your baby if your pregnancy carries on for too long. If your baby is larger than expected, your doctors might discuss your options for the delivery and may suggest an elective caesarean section.

Your blood glucose should be measured every hour during labour and birth. You may be given a drip in your arm with insulin and glucose if there are problems. Feed your baby as soon as possible after the birth — within 30 minutes — to help keep your baby's blood glucose at a safe level.

Your baby will have a heel prick blood test a few hours after they're born to check if their blood glucose level is too low.

If your baby's blood glucose can't be kept at a safe level, or they are having problems feeding, they may need extra care. Your baby may need to be fed through a tube or given a drip to increase their blood glucose. Read more about special care for babies. When your pregnancy is over, you won't need as much insulin to control your blood glucose.

You can decrease your insulin to your pre-pregnancy dose or return to the tablets you were taking before you became pregnant. Talk to your doctor about this.

You should be offered a test to check your blood glucose levels before you go home and at your 6-week postnatal check. You should also be given advice on diet and exercise. Page last reviewed: 12 April Next review due: 12 April Diabetes and pregnancy - Your pregnancy and baby guide Secondary navigation Getting pregnant Secrets to success Healthy diet Planning: things to think about Foods to avoid Alcohol Keep to a healthy weight Vitamins and supplements Exercise.

When you can get pregnant Signs and symptoms When you can take a test Finding out. Help if you're not getting pregnant Fertility tests Fertility treatments. Pregnancy and coronavirus Work out your due date When pregnancy goes wrong Sign up for weekly pregnancy emails. Early days Your NHS pregnancy journey Signs and symptoms of pregnancy Health things you should know Due date calculator Your first midwife appointment.

Pregnancy antenatal care with twins Pregnant with twins Healthy multiple pregnancy Getting ready for twins. Where to give birth: your options Antenatal classes Make and save your birth plan Pack your bag for birth. Due date calculator. Routine checks and tests Screening for Down's syndrome Checks for abnormalities week scan week scan Ultrasound scans If screening finds something.

What is antenatal care Your antenatal appointments Who's who in the antenatal team. The flu jab Whooping cough Can I have vaccinations in pregnancy? Healthy eating Foods to avoid Drinking alcohol while pregnant Exercise Vitamins and supplements Stop smoking Your baby's movements Sex in pregnancy Pharmacy and prescription medicines Reduce your risk of stillbirth Illegal drugs in pregnancy Your health at work Pregnancy infections Travel If you're a teenager.

Overweight and pregnant Mental health problems Diabetes in pregnancy Asthma and pregnancy Epilepsy and pregnancy Coronary heart disease and pregnancy Congenital heart disease and pregnancy. Hyperemesis gravidarum Pre-eclampsia Gestational diabetes Obstetric cholestasis.

Pregnancy and coronavirus Work out your due date Make and save your birth plan Maternity and paternity benefits Print your to-do list When pregnancy goes wrong. The start of labour Signs of labour What happens when you arrive at hospital Premature labour Induction.

What happens during labour and birth Forceps and ventouse delivery Pain relief Episiotomy What your birth partner can do Breech and transverse birth Caesarean Giving birth to twins What happens straight after the baby is born You after the birth Getting to know your newborn.

Feelings and relationships Dads and partners If you have a chronic condition When pregnancy goes wrong. Premature or ill babies Premature baby: mum's story Premature baby: dad's story. Pregnancy and coronavirus Make your birth plan. How to breastfeed Breastfeeding: the first few days Breastfeeding FAQs Breastfeeding positions and latch Benefits of breastfeeding Help and support Breastfeeding in public Expressing breast milk Breastfeeding a premature baby When to stop breastfeeding.

Common breastfeeding problems Breastfeeding and thrush Breastfeeding and tongue tie Is my baby getting enough milk? Help for sore nipples Breast pain while breastfeeding. Breastfeeding and diet Breastfeeding and medicines Breastfeeding and smoking Breastfeeding and alcohol Going back to work.

Bottle feeding advice Sterilising bottles Combining breast and bottle Making up infant formula Types of infant formula Infant formula: common questions. Newborn blood spot test Newborn hearing test Newborn physical examination.

What you'll need for your baby Washing and bathing your baby Getting your baby to sleep Soothing a crying baby How to change a nappy Nappy rash First aid kit for babies Baby car seats and car safety. Being a new parent Services for support for parents Rights and benefits for parents.

Your postnatal check Your post-pregnancy body Feeling depressed Sex and contraception Sleep and tiredness Coping with stress Keeping fit and healthy. Your newborn twins Multiple babies and sleep Feeding multiple babies Getting out and about Multiples and postnatal depression. Sign up for baby advice emails. Weaning and solid foods Your baby's first solid foods Babies: foods to avoid Food allergies in children Help your baby enjoy new foods What to feed young children Toddler food: common questions Fussy eaters Vegetarian and vegan children Vitamins for children Drinks and cups Food safety and hygiene Meal ideas for children.

Teething symptoms Tips for helping a teething baby Looking after your baby's teeth. Spotting signs of serious illness Reflux in babies How to take a baby's temperature Reducing the risk of SIDS Treating a high temperature Sleep problems in children Coughs, colds and ear infections Diarrhoea and vomiting Infectious illnesses Children's medicines Looking after a sick child Serious conditions and special needs Constipation in young children Your baby's height and weight Baby health and development reviews Leg and foot problems in children.

How to potty train Bedwetting in young children Potty training problems Why play is important Play ideas and reading Keeping babies and toddlers active Helping your child's speech Teaching everyday essentials Difficult behaviour in children Temper tantrums Separation anxiety.

Twins language development Twins at school. First aid kit for your baby Baby and toddler safety Safety in the sun Baby accidents: what to do Resuscitation a baby Helping a choking baby Car seats and child car safety.

Planning another pregnancy Children and new siblings Services and support for parents Rights and benefits for parents Lone parents. Being a parent Help with childcare Sign up for weekly baby and toddler emails. Hospitals and clinics are making sure it's safe for pregnant women to go to appointments.

Media last reviewed: 10 March Media review due: 10 March

Infant of a Mother with Diabetes

Diabetes Diabetes and getting pregnant. Having a chronic condition such as diabetes diabetes mellitus takes careful monitoring of your health at the best of times, and this becomes even more crucial during pregnancy, a time when your body changes dramatically. Most women who have pre-existing diabetes who become pregnant have type 1 diabetes once called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes , although some may have type 2 once called non-insulin dependent or maturity-onset diabetes.

If you have type 1 or 2 diabetes, it is very important to talk to your healthcare team if you are thinking about having a baby. There are some things that are best done before you get pregnant that will reduce your risk of pregnancy complications and baby loss. If you have type 1 or 2 diabetes, you need to be as healthy as possible before you conceive, and while you are pregnant.

Back to Your pregnancy and baby guide. Most pregnant women with diabetes will go on to have a healthy baby, but there are some possible complications you should be aware of. The information on this page is for women who were diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes before they got pregnant. It doesn't cover gestational diabetes — high blood sugar that develops during pregnancy and usually goes away after the baby is born.

Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes and Pregnancy

Log in Sign up. Before you begin Get ready for pregnancy Food, weight and fertility. Community groups. Home Getting pregnant Before you begin Existing health problems. Morag Martindale GP and expert in baby and women's health. If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes there are steps you can take to prepare yourself for pregnancy. You will need to be very careful to monitor your blood sugar glucose levels, though. Sometimes these complications can result in a baby being born with a life-long condition , although this is rare.

Diabetes and getting pregnant

If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and are planning a family, you should plan your pregnancy as much as possible. Controlling your blood sugars before conception and throughout pregnancy gives you the best chance of having a trouble-free pregnancy and birth and a healthy baby. Women with diabetes will need to closely monitor their blood sugar levels during their pregnancy. If you develop diabetes during pregnancy, it is called gestational diabetes. If you can, visit your doctor or diabetes educator at least 6 months before you start trying to fall pregnant.

Diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to keep blood sugar levels in the normal range.

Blood sugar that is not well controlled in a pregnant woman with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes could lead to problems for the woman and the baby:. The organs of the baby form during the first two months of pregnancy, often before a woman knows that she is pregnant. Blood sugar that is not in control can affect those organs while they are being formed and cause serious birth defects in the developing baby, such as those of the brain, spine, and heart.

Diabetes During Pregnancy

If you have diabetes and plan to have a baby, you should try to get your blood glucose levels close to your target range before you get pregnant. High blood glucose, also called blood sugar, can harm your baby during the first weeks of pregnancy, even before you know you are pregnant. If you have diabetes and are already pregnant, see your doctor as soon as possible to make a plan to manage your diabetes. Working with your health care team and following your diabetes management plan can help you have a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby.

Jump to content. Top of the page Decision Point. You may want to have a say in this decision, or you may simply want to follow your doctor's recommendation. Either way, this information will help you understand what your choices are so that you can talk to your doctor about them. You can have a healthy pregnancy if your blood sugar is in a target range before you get pregnant and you don't have high blood pressure or problems from diabetes, such as kidney disease.

We value your feedback

Being well-prepared for pregnancy can help reduce the risk of complications, keep you healthy throughout your pregnancy, and give your baby a good start in life. Hormonal changes during pregnancy make diabetes even more challenging. The majority of women who properly control their diabetes before and during pregnancy have successful pregnancies, and give birth to beautiful, healthy babies. Women with diabetes have a higher risk of miscarriage and of having a baby with birth defects heart and kidney defects, for example. If your blood glucose sugar levels are poorly controlled, you should avoid becoming pregnant until your healthcare team has helped you improve your blood sugar control. With the intensification of treatment for women with diabetes, the mortality of newborns has decreased significantly, but remains slightly higher in women with poorly controlled diabetes, especially if they have episodes of ketosis, ketoacidosis or hypertension during pregnancy. Strict blood sugar control from preconception to delivery and close monitoring by a multidisciplinary team in a specialized centre can greatly reduce most of these risks. This may seem a tall order, but it is achievable.

Jan 26, - FACT: The healthier your blood sugar levels are, the easier getting pregnant will be, but women with type 1 diabetes can have difficulty getting.

An infant of a mother with diabetes is a baby who is born to a mother with diabetes. Because the mother has diabetes, the baby is at risk for problems. People with diabetes have high levels of sugar in their blood hyperglycemia. Over time, this can lead to serious health problems.

Pregnancy if You Have Diabetes

Pregnancy and diabetes doesn't have to be a risky combination. By preparing for pregnancy, you can boost the odds of delivering a healthy baby. Here's how. If you have diabetes — either type 1 or type 2 — and you're thinking about having a baby, you might worry about possible risks.

Interactive Tools

Many people believe that getting pregnant when they already have diabetes is not possible because of the struggles women in the past may have faced, which preceded more modern treatments, monitoring tools, and knowledge. Today, however, being diabetic does not mean that your pregnancy is destined for struggle, complications, or miscarriage. That said, you do need to be proactive in your diabetes care prior to pregnancy to optimize you and your baby's health and prevent possible complications, like birth defects.

.

.

Diabetes: Should I Get Pregnant?

.

Pregnancy in Women with Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes

.

Comments: 0
  1. No comments yet.

Thanks! Your comment will appear after verification.
Add a comment

© 2020 Online - Advisor on specific issues.