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What to look for in a mans suit

Updated: March 29, References. Buying a suit is a task that many men put off for as long as possible. Ultimately there will be an occasion arises that calls for business attire, and a good quality suit will be essential. Fortunately, there are a few ways to make the process of buying a man's suit a little less painful and time consuming by making a few decisions before you ever step into a clothing shop. Log in Facebook.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: 10 SUIT MISTAKES MEN MAKE And How To Fix Them - Alex Costa

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Best suits for men 2020: look sharp in these suits

There are so many decisions involved — and screwing up just ONE can cost you hundreds or even thousands of dollars. That way you can enjoy a perfect fit, every time. The Anson Belt's buckles and straps are detachable so you have the power to assemble any belt you can imagine.

That's 6 different possible complete belt combinations. We'll assume you're starting at Ground Zero. Maybe this is your first suit — or it's been a decade since you bought a suit but you need one in two weeks for a wedding. A lot of guys make the mistake of trying to palm off a pair of trousers and a similar jacket as a suit. Your first step is to make a decision: will you buy your suit online or offline? Which is better? That depends on what YOU value. For convenience, nothing beats buying online.

You can buy a custom suit at 2 AM in your underwear while drinking a beer. If you want customer service, go to a higher-end menswear store — you can spend 30 minutes with an expert who can identify your body type and which styles and colors will look best on you. The real price range of suits is much wider. Suit buying rule 2 — set your budget. Want a more specific number? Budget half your monthly salary — not just for the suit but for everything that goes with it.

That includes the shoes, the shirt and the belt , which we'll talk about later. That suit's just hanging on a rack waiting for you to buy it. For most people this will work fine — and you'll find the best deals here. This is a great option if you're hard to fit. For your first suit — ignore bespoke. Bespoke suits are a work of art, but they're much higher in price. Blends aren't necessarily bad — they'll save you a lot of money.

But they are a sign of a lower-end suit — a manufacturer who uses blends is probably cutting corners elsewhere too. There's not a uniform system to these numbers. In general, a higher number means a tighter yarn and therefore a more luxurious drape. Now, what about color? Pick one of three — navy, charcoal, or gray. No light gray, and no blue — those are too casual. And no black — that's for black tie. A small pattern that's not noticeable is perfectly fine, but avoid noticeable patterns until you're on your third, fourth, or fifth suit.

Fit is king. Do not buy a suit that doesn't fit you, unless you know it can be adjusted. If you have to pay more to get something that fits — go ahead. If you're unusually tall, short, thin, stout, or muscular, you may have to go custom.

For the rest of you — here are the specific areas to focus on to get a well-fitted suit off the rack. Don't buy it if the shoulders don't fit. Adjusting jacket shoulders is like heart surgery — it's very complicated and very expensive! If you can fit two fists in the front of the jacket, it's way too big. A tailor can bring it in a bit — but more than two inches will change the proportions and the position of the pockets and the jacket will look bad.

What if it's too tight in the chest? Higher-end suits should have some extra fabric in the seams so a tailor can let it out by about an inch. Put your arms by your sides.

The jacket should reach down to your knuckles, give or take an inch. At the back — your jacket should cover your buttocks. It shouldn't be much longer or shorter than that. Put your arms by your sides again — the sleeve should go to about your wrist-bone and show a quarter to a half inch of your shirt cuff. If the sleeves are way off, don't worry. They're one of the easiest things to adjust — up to an inch and a half, or even two inches on bigger suits.

Make sure the waist fits you well. If it's slightly too big — or even slightly too tight — a tailor can fix that. Also, pay attention to the hip area. Your tailor may complain about adjusting this — but if it's way too loose, get it brought in. Your choice depends on your personal preference and your height. If you're a taller guy you want to go with a full break. If you're a shorter guy go with no break. Again — fit is king. When you're buying a suit off the rack, the store should have a tailor who'll adjust it for you.

If they charge for this, it's not a bad thing — you'll often find you get better service because you're paying for it. Click here to read our quick guide to how a man's suit should fit. You want to create a timeless suit that will serve you six months from now and six years from now — not a fashion trend that'll be out of style in a year. When buying a suit you'll notice there are one, two, three, four, and even five-button suits.

Stay away from the ones, fours, and fives. It's a great classic look. If you're taller and want to look a little more formal you can go with three. This is a three-button suit where the top button is designed to be left undone. Peak lapels are more formal than notch lapels.

They're fine if you really like the look — but be aware that they'll grab attention. Your best bet is the notch lapel. It's not going to win any awards for creativity — but it's timeless and will still be in style in a decade. Vents are the slits in the back of your jacket that give you more room to move. You can choose a single vent, double vent, or no vent.

No vent is rare — mostly found in custom and Italian suits. It looks fine if you don't put your hands in your pockets and if you want to create a slimmer profile. Try putting your hand in your pocket with this one — everyone can see your backside. The double vent is the best. When you're walking it creates a more streamlined look — and it's designed not to show your backside even if you're riding a horse.

Yes — a suit is a jacket and trousers made from the same material. But it's also everything that goes with it to make you a sharp-dressed man. A chain is only as strong as its weakest link — so getting details like your shirt wrong can weaken the entire look.

Light blue, pink, and lavender are all acceptable colors for dress shirts — but classic white is best. It's the most formal, creates the highest contrast, and matches almost anything. A good fit in the neck area is key because you're going to button it up and wear it with a necktie. A well-fitted shirt collar should allow for two fingers to slip through — no more, and no less. Also, make sure it's got a turn-down collar in a medium spread or a point.

Point is the classic collar that works with most necktie knots. If you prefer a wider knot you can go for a medium spread. Don't go for a wide spread — that's a more casual style. And definitely avoid button-down collars — they're way too casual for a suit. The shirt cuff should be a single button.

You can also go for a two-button if you get something custom made. Cufflinks are not recommended for your first suit — they're more formal and take a bit of attitude to pull off. Oxfords are the most formal shoe style thanks to the sleek simplicity of their closed lacing system. Closed lacing means the front part of the shoe the vamp covers the back part the quarters — producing a clean smooth look. The black Balmoral Oxford is the classic complement to a suit.

A brown Derby is more casual still because it has an open lacing system with the quarters on top of the vamp but you can still pull it off with a suit. Loafers are really too informal for all but the most casual suits. But you can get away with them, especially in the United States at a casual event.

17 Simple Rules for Buying the Perfect Suit

A couple of truths about suits: 1 You need at least one. Exactly how much is up to you. You can also drop a grand or more. It all comes down to options.

Every man should own a great suit. Zero exceptions.

You have to look good for graduation photos and job interviews , right? So, what should your first suit be? This article will discuss the nitty-gritty details of what you should look for in your first suit. Black Lapel Made-to-Measure Suit.

The Types Of Suit Every Man Should Own

By Spencer Hart TZ. Wearing a suit should be like stepping into new skin — you should feel comfortable in your suits and know how different styling options can affect your look. A good suit can make you look taller, slimmer and accentuate your shoulders. It can also help with making the right impression in your career. With so many suits available it can be easy to get lost in the swathes of choice. A simple two-button suit is the workhorse of your wardrobe. The versatile silhouette can be dressed up for weddings, or dressed down for the office.

9 Tips for Buying a New Suit

For the remainder, suits are a necessary evil: an insurance policy for professional and social occasions that you want to spend the bare minimum on. Whichever camp you fall into, allow us to illuminate you. This is the FashionBeans guide to building a tailoring wardrobe. Not in the IKEA sense, more along the lines of what to buy, and in what order, to most economically cover your event bases and get maximum bang for your sartorial buck.

There are so many decisions involved — and screwing up just ONE can cost you hundreds or even thousands of dollars. That way you can enjoy a perfect fit, every time.

Updated: December 19, References. Many people wear suits for special occasions. Whether it be for a cocktail party, wedding, reunion, funeral, or a job interview, looking good in a suit is top priority. Log in Facebook.

5 Things Every Man Should Know Before Buying A Suit.

Guaranteed to make you instantly look and feel better, a well-cut suit really does maketh the man. Be a dapper dude and read on. First up, colour. Your best bet is to opt for one in a solid true navy blue or charcoal grey.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: 4 Secrets to Look Sexier in a Suit

Buying a new suit doesn't start in the store, it starts in your head. Is the suit for work? Date night? A buddy's wedding? All three? Know that and you can make the right choices, starting with color.

A Man’s First Suit: What To Buy & How To Wear It

Recently I had the chance to go and get my first ever tailored suit, and let me tell you, it was a game changer!! When I walked out on stage to present in front of 1, people, not only did I look great or so I was told , but I felt great too. The suit fit incredibly well, I got a ton of compliments on it and getting a custom suit was an experience I will definitely be repeating in the future. The whole experience had left me wondering why no one had ever told me what a great feeling getting suited up could be, so I wanted to share my insight about what you need to know before getting suited up. Determine your budget and be as generous with it as you can, as it will dictate quality and longevity of your investment.

Sep 28, - Every guy—even Ralph Lauren himself—started as a suit virgin, and we know that your first time standing in the suiting section can be.

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The GQ Guide to Suits

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10 Rules For Buying A Suit (Men’s Suit Buying Guide)

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Back To Suit School: Styling Rules Every Man Needs To Know

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